About this blog

Translator's Shack is a collection of links, news, reviews and opinions about translation technologies. It's edited and updated by Roberto Savelli, an English to Italian translator, project manager and company owner of Albatros Soluzioni Linguistiche, a team of English-Italian translators, which hosts and supports this blog.


The Life as a PM category, managed by Gabriella Ascari, contains topics that are less technical in nature, but which we're sure will be appreciated by owners of small translation businesses and freelancers.


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Thoughts On Translation blog: Resources for free and open source software users

Corinne McKay’s blog contains a useful post about free and open-source resources for translators. I have posted a comment to her post, but I’m re-posting it here because I think it’s relevant to this blog.

Perhaps Linux “live CDs” are a good option for Windows users who have doubts about switching to Linux from Windows and do not want to alter their system’s partitions, settings etc. I have tried Knoppix and I think it’s a good choice if you want to get a taste of Linux without getting into trouble.

One aspect that I would like to point out is the choice of your main translation environment tool TEnT. If you are a professional translator and if you spend a great deal of your time working with such a tool, perhaps choosing the platform Linux, Mac, Windows first and then choosing your TEnT as a consequence might not be your best option, since your choice will be very limited on certain platforms.

My suggestion is to gather as much information as possible about TEnTs and choose the one that best fits your and your clients’ needs, and then choose the operating system as a consequence of that.

Wordfast Pro, Heartsome and OmegaT are good tools, but, like all other TEnTs, they have limitations. Perhaps choosing a commercial tool that works on Windows instead of Linux might be a better choice if you notice that this makes you more productive. Of course some commercial tools look expensive at first sight, but what you really should consider is your productivity and why not? fun in using the tool.

Any initial saving you make by using an inexpensive solution no matter if this is open-source, commercial, shareware, etc. will be wasted if this solution is noticeably less productive than another product that has a high purchase price but that will perfectly pay for itself in the long term.

via Resources for free and open source software users « Thoughts On Translation.

Anaphraseus (free, open-source, multi-platform translation memory tool based on OpenOffice) version 1.23 beta released

Here is a previous mini-review I wrote about this program.

These are the improvements added in this beta version:

  • Clean Up in text tables
  • OmegaT TMX format loading.
  • Slight changes in TM loading code.
  • Simple statistic.
  • Big icons for Ubuntu and MacOS
  • Fixed bug in creation *.ini file on Linux
  • Fixed bug in Vista open/save dialogs
  • Added Wordfast TM’s character codes
  • Code reviewed under Wordfast’s specifications
  • All TMX operation runs by "TMX Import" button now
  • Fixed bug with delimiter

Via: SourceForge.net: Anaphraseus: Files

Tool to translate Trados TagEditor (TTX) files using OmegaT

image Kevin Lossner of the Translation Tribulations blog reports the release of “Toxic”, a tool by the OmegaT developers that should allow translators to use OmegaT for translating files saved in TagEditor.

The script, which includes a “readme” instruction file, is available here:

http://www.omegat.org/resources/toxic.zip

Via Translation Tribulations: Toxic for OmegaT!

Translator handbook for open-source projects

image The YACS (yet another community system) blog contains a Translator handbook section that can be useful to translators interested in contributing to the translation effort of open-source projects.

Although the posts date back to 2007 and some instructions are specific to the YACS system, they can be useful to translators who are starting their first projects in the open-source world. Here are the links to the single articles:

Translator handbook – www.yacs.fr